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Explore our Sculpture Gallery

Browse the sculptures here at Hacienda del Sol! To purchase any of these art pieces, contact art@haciendadelsol.com.

Tamarind | Hector Ortega & Taryn Moore

A collaboration between Hector Ortega and Taryn Moore, the undulating shapes, tapering geometrics and circular format represent the viewpoints and inspiration of these two talented metal artists. Creating a charming counterpoint to the hard-edged steel fabrication seen during the day, at night “Tamarind” is lit from within, casting a gentle, multicolored, wistful glow.

Tamarind is a fruit-bearing tree indigenous to tropical Africa and naturalized in Asia and it forms the basis for culinary recipes from Colombia to Costa Rica, Peru to Venezuela, as well as western Mediterranean countries. Both artists share a concern for the human condition and the interconnectedness of the natural world. Perhaps that acknowledgement is cleverly echoed in the title.

For more information regarding the work of Hector and Taryn:

Art & Life with Taryn Moore

Ortega Sculpture

8’H x 29”W x 29” circumference, Steel with LED lights in center | $15,000

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Infinity Mobile | Rigsby Frederick

Anchored atop a simple base is a stainless steel circle; suspended from the center of the circle like a pendant is a segment of green translucent agate. All the materials used for this sculpture point to a poetic exploration of the concept of timelessness and our grasp of infinity.

The conversation begins with the base: deceptive in its simplicity, it is composed of petrified wood. Trees buried in wet sediment over millions of years became fossilized, their organic matter replaced by minerals—wood turning into stone.

The stainless steel circle represents an ancient global symbol that stands for timelessness, totality, wholeness, the magical beginning point of all things, union with the divine, and sacred aspects of the natural world.

And then there is the agate, created via a similar process as the petrified wood. Nodules are formed within the pockets or cavities in volcanic rock by the continued accumulation of silica-rich groundwater. The silica is deposited on the walls of the cavity, forming a silica gel. The gel crystallizes, forming a layer of chalcedony. More groundwater seeps in. More silica gel gets deposited, crystallizing once again. 

It takes millions of years for the agate to form, and this slice of solidified water and captured time is suspended within the center of the circle, reflecting the light as it moves gently in the wind.

68”H x 42”W Stainless steel, agate, petrified wood | $5,000

Visit his website here.

Learn more about this artist here.

Standing Man | Art Neptune

At the top of parking lot D, gazing across the vista as if in a moment of thought, is the Standing Man.

This 12’ figure is constructed of mild steel, a steel that is mixed with a small amount of carbon, making it strong and tough, but not readily tempered. The limbs of Standing Man are created out of rusted circular metal shapes. His torso is four steel frames in which is nestled a wire-encased scarlet ceramic heart.

Art Neptune, who fabricated Standing Man, is a long-time friend of Hacienda del Sol. Much like the planet Neptune, this reclusive artist circles the edges of our society and is without a social media presence by preference.

12’H x 58”W x 16”D Mild steel, wire and ceramic heart | $12,000

Sacred Symbols | Rigsby Frederick

On the right side of the main entrance of Hacienda del Sol sits a sculpture that vibrates with quiet intensity:  “Sacred Symbols” is a mixed-media piece fashioned by the multi-talented sculptor, Rigsby Frederick.

This sculpture is a micro-focal-point for the incredible depth and breadth of human history. Carved on both sides of half of a sandstone grinding wheel are symbols reaching beyond antiquity: The spiral, one of the most ancient universal pictographs, used since prehistoric times, incorporated into Native American, African and Indigenous wisdom, it can mean Life’s Journey or one’s placement in The Cosmos.

The Egyptian Ankh is connected to Isis and Osiris, is represents eternal life, strength and health. The zig-zag symbol can be traced to the Mezolithic as part of the potent use of sympathetic magic in to protect, heal, or ensure a successful hunt.  Above the zig-zag line is a cross. While primarily connected with Christianity, the cross has its roots in Upper Paleolithic global pagan iconography.

On the other side of the sculpture is the hexagram, or Mogen David. Most often associated with Judaism, the six-pointed star is a potent universal symbol. In Buddhism it represents peace and harmony, Islam the Seal of Solomon” The hexagram also refers to the Anahata, a sign for the Heart Chakra. In Sanscrit, Anahata means the “unstruck sound” or the tone of the Celestial Realm. 

At the top of the sculpture, in a deft play on words, is a section from a brass cymbal, an instrument that has existed since ancient times.  

63”H x 28”W x 12”D Sand stone, grind wheel, limestone and brass cymbal section | $6,000

Learn more about this artist here.

Hera | John Benedict

This tall, impressive sculpture is made of steel intentionally allowed to rust by the elements.

The Greek goddess Hera was the wife of Zeus and bore him many children who were themselves gods. She endured Zeus’s many infidelities, coming to be known as the protector of women, particularly in childbirth. She is often portrayed holding a scepter symbolizing her power and authority as queen of the gods and goddesses. In this iteration, John has added a butterfly resting on her left hand, perhaps emphasizing her more loving and gentle nature.

John has been a sculptor for 28 years and angelic female figures are a recurring theme in his work. He sources recycled metal when possible, combining it with new steel when necessary to accomplish the forms he imagines.  The double-contouring of Hera is the product of five different computer programs. 

11”H x 18”W x 36”D Rusted steel | $5,200

Medicine Moment | Ralph Prata

At the height of the pandemic, as our world was changing, new figures were coming into being. These mixed-media sculptures came out of a moment fraught with uncertainty, and true to his artist’s eye, Prata was able to create beauty out of found objects, natural and manmade. 

The heads of these semi-abstract figures are made of a special concrete mixture formulated by the artist. The facial features are minimally referenced by cowrie shells from Africa. Cowrie shells have long held significance in many African cultures, from divination to personal adornment. Up until the late 19th Century, they were even used as money.

There is another transformational quality to these quietly captivating pieces: Bullets and shotgun shells…elements of violence transformed into serene beings imbued with feminine energy and yet neither male nor female…androgynous.

These sculptural wall hangings represent another step in Ralph’s continuing work in concrete and incorporating found objects: “Each work is created in the moment through a spontaneous and improvisational process. I try to bring something into existence that will enhance the lives of all who encounter my work, including myself.”

65”H x 39”W x 10”D Hand cast concrete, shotgun shells, found objects, cowrie shells | $3,000

Truth in Beauty | Ralph Prata

At the height of the pandemic, as our world was changing, new figures were coming into being. These mixed-media sculptures came out of a moment fraught with uncertainty, and true to his artist’s eye, Prata was able to create beauty out of found objects, natural and manmade. 

The heads of these semi-abstract figures are made of a special concrete mixture formulated by the artist. The facial features are minimally referenced by cowrie shells from Africa. Cowrie shells have long held significance in many African cultures, from divination to personal adornment. Up until the late 19th Century, they were even used as money.

There is another transformational quality to these quietly captivating pieces: Bullets and shotgun shells…elements of violence transformed into serene beings imbued with feminine energy and yet neither male nor female…androgynous.

These sculptural wall hangings represent another step in Ralph’s continuing work in concrete and incorporating found objects: “Each work is created in the moment through a spontaneous and improvisational process. I try to bring something into existence that will enhance the lives of all who encounter my work, including myself.”

68”H x 18”W x 4.5”D Hand cast concrete, shotgun shells, found objects, cowrie shells | $3,000

Alone But Not Alone | Ralph Prata

At the height of the pandemic, as our world was changing, new figures were coming into being. These mixed-media sculptures came out of a moment fraught with uncertainty, and true to his artist’s eye, Prata was able to create beauty out of found objects, natural and manmade. 

The heads of these semi-abstract figures are made of a special concrete mixture formulated by the artist. The facial features are minimally referenced by cowrie shells from Africa. Cowrie shells have long held significance in many African cultures, from divination to personal adornment. Up until the late 19th Century, they were even used as money.

There is another transformational quality to these quietly captivating pieces: Bullets and shotgun shells…elements of violence transformed into serene beings imbued with feminine energy and yet neither male nor female…androgynous.

These sculptural wall hangings represent another step in Ralph’s continuing work in concrete and incorporating found objects: “Each work is created in the moment through a spontaneous and improvisational process. I try to bring something into existence that will enhance the lives of all who encounter my work, including myself.”

61”H x 22”W x 7”D Hand cast concrete, shotgun shells, found objects, cowrie shells | $3,000

Sizzler | Dan Lehman

Dan Lehman has been deeply influenced by the stark beauty of the West Texas landscape while resonating with the spare poetry of large industrial forms. You can see this inspiration in his forged steel sculptureSizzler” which is an unexpected amalgamation of organic and mechanical shapes.

Forging is one of the oldest known metalworking techniques and is incredibly labor intensive. It involves heating steel to blazing high temperatures (950˚ to 1250˚ Celsius) and then shaping it through extremely heavy pressure, either by hammer or the use of a press. Dan’s expertise in this challenging process is evident in the contrasts in his work between hard edges and suggested natural forms.

99”H x 27”W x 10”D forged steel on a 36” x 16” base | $16,000

Learn more about this artist here.

Brother #1 | Gary Anderson

Cut and shaped of rusting steel, profiles are somewhat unique in Gary’s work, in that his pieces are usually much larger scale. This one echoes the Art Deco style that emerged in the 1930s. The artist has designed the profile so that it can be removed from the base.

Gary Anderson’s relationship with steel began when he worked his way through college in a steel factory. That relationship continues to this day as the same workplace cuts and forms the basic shapes of his work for him. He is now retired from the workaday world and is happy creating sculptures full-time. Although he has occasionally worked in stainless steel, the hues of rusted steel are his preferred media, as they remind him of the landscape around Moab, Utah, a place he frequents for creative inspiration.

21”H x 21”W x 10”D Rusted steel on 11”x 11” trapezoid steel base | $2,500

Learn more about this artist here.

Brother #2 | Gary Anderson

Cut and shaped of rusting steel, profiles are somewhat unique in Gary’s work, in that his pieces are usually much larger scale. This one employs jagged shapes symbolizing electricity, a common industrial motif in the Art Deco style that emerged in the 1930's. The artist has designed the profile so that it can be removed from the base.

Gary Anderson’s relationship with steel began when he worked his way through college in a steel factory. That relationship continues to this day as the same workplace cuts and forms the basic shapes of his work for him. He is now retired from the workaday world and is happy creating sculptures full-time. Although he has occasionally worked in stainless steel, the hues of rusted steel are his preferred media, as they remind him of the landscape around Moab, Utah, a place he frequents for creative inspiration.

23”H x 22”W x 10”D Rusted steel on a 11”x 11” trapezoid steel base | $2,500

Learn more about this artist here.

Brother #3 | Gary Anderson

Cut and shaped of rusting steel, profiles are somewhat unique in Gary’s work, in that his pieces are usually much larger scale. This one employs the sharp-edge linear shapes that helped define the Art Deco style that emerged in the 1930's and later appeared in post-war automobile styling. The artist has designed the profile so that it can be removed from the base.

Gary Anderson’s relationship with steel began when he worked his way through college in a steel factory. That relationship continues to this day as the same workplace cuts and forms the basic shapes of his work for him. He is now retired from the workaday world and is happy creating sculptures full-time. Although he has occasionally worked in stainless steel, the hues of rusted steel are his preferred media, as they remind him of the landscape around Moab, Utah, a place he frequents for creative inspiration.

18”H x 27”W x 11”D Rusted steel on a 11”x 11” trapezoid steel base | $2,500

Learn more about this artist here.

Moon Shadow | Gary Anderson

This 8-foot-tall semi-abstract sculpture is made of steel intentionally allowed to rust in the elements.

It is possible to recognize a moon-like crescent (or two or three) supported by a strong vertical—or perhaps a crescent moon and its “double” or shadow, as if that were possible.

Gary Anderson’s relationship with steel began when he worked his way through college in a steel factory. That relationship continues to this day as the same workplace cuts and forms the basic shapes of his work for him. He is now retired from the workaday world and is happy creating sculptures full-time.

Although he has occasionally worked in stainless steel, the hues of rusted steel are his preferred media, as they remind him of the landscape around Moab, Utah, a place he frequents for creative inspiration.

8’H x 44”W Steel | $4,000

Learn more about this artist here.

 

 

The Ties That Bind | Al Glann

Following a successful career in teaching, design and illustration in the Midwest, Al relocated to Arizona in 1996, where he continued to teach while exploring his sculptural style in steel and bronze. In 2010 Al retired from teaching to devote himself full-time to his sculpture and moved to Tucson. His work has been shown in North America and Europe and he is represented by galleries in Arizona, California, Colorado and Kentucky.

His work takes many of its themes from nature: birds, buffaloes, horses, etc. “The Ties That Bind” is feminine in style, as are many of his figurative pieces. They are often winged and their forms imply flying motion.

What are some of the suggestions or allusions of this figure? Are it's arms crossed in front of it? Do the copper cords around the waist, legs and feet signify suffering or might they be symbolic of limitation?

77”H x 9”W x 9”D Steel with copper | $4,200

Learn more about this artist here.

My Emotions | Art Neptune

Comprised of large sheets of metal with iridescent multi-colored patina, “My Emotions” stands near the entrance to the Spa at Hacienda del Sol.

Juxtaposing a large abstract work with a title evoking human qualities poses an impressive intellectual conundrum for the viewer.

Art Neptune is a long-time friend of Hacienda del Sol. Much like the planet Neptune, this reclusive artist circles the edges of our society and is without a social media presence by preference.

8'H x 8'W Curved patterned/painted aluminum | $15,000

The Unseen | Ralph Prata

Ralph Prata looks at a scrap of metal, sees the curve of a broken branch on the ground, and an entire new world emerges. Found objects coupled with his own special hand-mixed concrete (a blend of sand, aggregate and cement) find new life as fantabulous Beings and mystical Creatures.

In this case, Ralph has created two owls; tall, totem-like and gazing across the landscape. Or are they focused on something we cannot see, something beyond our ken and understanding. Owls often represent wisdom, change and intuition. According to Greek mythology, the goddess Athena had an owl that sat on her “blind side.” The owl gave her insight at the ability to see into the truth of all things.

Certain indigenous tribes held the owl in great regard as a messenger of death and also a foreteller of future events. The bodies of these owls are hand-carved, their wings rusted metal that Ralph found on his numerous walks through the desert. He calls his work “concrete abstracts,” and he says that “each work is created in the moment through a spontaneous and improvisational process.”

Perhaps the Spirit of the Owl came to him and inspired these two enigmatic creatures.

Larger one: 90"H x 46"W  Mixed Media

Smaller one: 78.5"H x 55.5"W  Mixed Media | $1,500 for both

 

A Shift in Time | Al Glann

Standing alongside the drive up to Hacienda’s Valet Circle is Al Glann’s stainless-steel sculpture, “A Shift in Time.” It's rhythmic organic shapes are reminiscent of tendrils reaching up toward the sunlight—perhaps seaweed or ferns—such growth symbolizing nature’s eternal cycle of renewed life returning after the cold, dark winter.

One interesting detail: one of the strands is missing a small section, as if growth briefly stopped and restarted—much like when digital images on the internet occasionally break down into jumbled pixels before reassembling and continuing.

Maybe there’s a metaphor for living our lives, as well. Often we are confronted with obstacles that seem insurmountable or problems that may appear unsolvable, yet life continues and carries us along into the future.

103"H x 2'W Stainless Steel | $7,200

Learn more about this artist here.

Cactus Composite | Steven Derks

Noted Tucson sculptor Steven Derks is a self-taught artist working in metal, composing pieces out of found objects. During the 1980s, he worked as a Native Plant Specialist, or as he puts it— “cactus cop”.

Because of his natural artistic eye and years among cacti and succulents, he began to view them in a different way. In 2001 Steve began to photograph cactus so that their hidden symmetry was revealed. Photographing them from overhead also gave the cacti an otherworldly quality: They could be spoors floating in space or macro-images of bacteria. Some of the cacti even bear a resemblance to sea urchins, perhaps a poetic memory when the Sonoran Desert used to be a Paleozoic Sea.

69"H x 126"W Photo Print on Vinyl | $2,500

Learn more about the artist here.

Mia | Art Neptune

Art Neptune is a long-time friend of Hacienda del Sol. Much like the planet Neptune, this reclusive artist circles the edges of our society and is without a social media presence by preference.

52"H x 32"W Torch Cut Steel | $7,500

Promise of Things to Come | Steven Derks

“Making art allows me to have a spiritual and psychological life without being directly involved in any theology or ideology.” This quote from sculptor Steven Derks provides a key to viewing his work.

In “Promise of Things To Come,” the large rusted steel circle, a symbol of unity and infinity, serves as the base. The circle can also represent the self and wholeness. A smaller circle is cut out from within. From this point, reaching skyward, are shapes echoing an outward thrust. Are they new thoughts, new ideas, a different directional alignment? We don’t know. We can only step into the concept that the title conveys and see what comes up for ourselves.

84"H x 43"W Rusted Steel | $9,000

Learn more about the artist here.

Bull | Carlos Carulo

Born in Chile and now residing in Santa Fe, Carulo’s dramatic sculpture “The Bull” appears to be guarding the Terraza Garden Patio.

Carulo refers to his work as Situationalism—always changing based on the current emotional situation of life but reflecting the influences of Picasso’s cubism and Kandinsky’s improvisations. 

90"H x 42"W x 25"D Corton Steel | $20,000

Learn more about this artist here.

Off The Grid | Rigsby Frederick

This mixed-media sculpture is a study in contradictions. The title implies escape from the man-made world of concrete, asphalt, and electricity, yet the stainless steel rectangular shape perched atop a log of petrified wood seems to make reference to that very world. If you let the deeper meaning of the name guide you, something else may appear.

Within the rectangular shape are a series of lines. Perhaps they are reflections of nature: the patterns of snakeskin, the markings on a turtle’s shell, fish scales, undulating waves of water.

Part of our spirit is forever wedded to nature, even if we only recognize it in a seemingly simple piece of art.

56"H x 43"W x 15"D Stainless Steel, petrified wood | $2,500

Learn more about this artist here.

Bee Habitat | Greg Corman

Tucsonan Greg Corman is a landscape designer as well as a sculptor. His career in desert horticulture has taken him to Australia and the Middle East as well as his home ground, the Southwest U.S. His work is primarily sourced from used wood and steel, as he is drawn to the intrinsic beauty of the imperfections in those materials. 

He also specializes in what he calls "Functional Art," work that combines his artistry with actual wildlife habitats such as raptor perches and lizard lairs! Greg's belief in the importance of bees in our environment has led him to create bee habitats as sculptures. Typically, he drills holes in a section of wood. Female bees will find the holes and deposit pollen and leaf fragments in them before laying eggs so that their newborns will have sustenance.

The holes in this piece are along the edge and most of them are filled.

73"H x 14"W x 20.5"D Wood and Steel | $3,500